The Wellness Show takes place at the Vancouver Convention Centre West Feb. 1 and 2, 2020.


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What a year 2019 was! The climate crisis (which was just declared the word of the year) came sharply into the spotlight, championed by the unflagging efforts of a 16-year-old girl. The meat-free revolution went mainstream this year, thanks to Beyond Burger being available now at most fast-food chains.

Looking ahead, what are the wellness trends for the upcoming year and decade?


RingFit Adventure is just one of many new products that help people workout at home.

Smart workouts

Technology is increasingly taking our workouts from the gym or the yoga studio, and bringing them right into our living rooms. We’re seeing a focus on in-home workouts, based on the popularity of workout interfaces like Mirror and Peloton. Nintendo is about to release Ring Fit Adventure, an add-on to the Nintendo Switch that incorporates you physically into the virtual world of a video game, and delivers a smart workout to boot. You’ll be able to try this new interface at the 2020 Wellness Show.

CBD-infused Skincare

CBD, or cannabidiol, can be derived from the hemp plant, a cousin to marijuana. Unlike marijuana’s key ingredient, THC, CBD will not get you high. Hemp-derived CBD is available in a growing range of wellness products, from skincare oils to bath soaps and balms and many others. Rocker and vegan activist Bif Naked will make a special guest appearance at The Wellness Show to launch her new CBD line, Mona Lisa Healing.


IV therapy is one of the latest trends in wellness.

Wellness intensives

As science begins to keep pace with wellness trends, getting intensive doses of holistic care becomes more accessible. IV therapy is a pumped-up version of taking vitamins, infusing your body with a strong dose of B-Vitamins or Iron if you are feeling droopy. Intensive stays at spas, including massage, yoga, aromatherapy, healthy food and the naturally healing waters of hot springs. Hollyhock on Cortez Island also offers immersive wellness programs, from yoga and meditation to mindfulness and Qi Gong. Core Potentials will create a holistic wellness plan that includes food, exercise and mindfulness.

Wellness from your phone

As technology gets smarter, more and more wellness applications are being delivered to us through our devices. Earlier this year, Telus launched Babylon, an app that allows you to see a doctor through video chat. There are now a variety of tests that you can take via your smartphone, and a “smart sleep mask” that gently lures you to sleep and then wakes you up using red and blue light technology. Helthe Connect is an app created to connect people and organizations with wellness practitioners—kind of a matchmaking app—but for your health and wellness journey. Bios Medical offers blood pressure monitoring devices that send data to your phone to help determine your average blood pressure over a week, and to figure out how to manage it better.


Visitors at the Wellness Show will have the opportunity to try the Helight.

Light therapy

There is a growing body of evidence that light therapy is hugely effective—especially during these dark winter months when natural sunlight is increasingly rare. Light therapy can be accessed both at home by using commercially-produced lamps that help mimic the effects of the sun’s rays. This therapy is quite effective in dealing with Seasonal Affective Disorder. Other more powerful forms of light therapy are thought to help with sports injuries and pain, relaxation and stress relief. Try the Helight or get a Bioptron session at the Wellness Show.

Sound bathing

Everything old is new again, it seems, and sound bathing, an ancient wellness practice, is no exception. Participants lay on the floor on yoga mats, and get comfy. Then the practitioner plays sounds on singing bowls made of crystal. The overall effect on your brain is much like meditation; it causes a state of deep relaxation. Sound bathing may have other positive effects, both physically and mentally as well. Pick up some singing bowls from Crafts of Tibet, and experiment.

Forest bathing

Though the name implies you’ll be submerged in water, that is not the case with forest bathing. And it’s more than just taking a walk in the woods. Based on the ancient Japanese practice of shinrin-yoku, forest bathing is more like a walking meditation in the woods. It’s about mindfulness and observation, breathing and seeing, rather than cardio. Connecting with nature is proven to lower levels of cortisol, reduce blood pressure and even increase immunity. Curious? Join in on a Bagua Walking Meditation, as demonstrated by Puti Meditation College. Participants in this group meditation walk in circles around a tree, focusing their energy on it, while holding various poses.


Healthy convenience foods have grown in popularity.

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Healthy convenience

What we put in our bodies is a growing concern for many, but we’re also feeling short on time to prepare healthy meals and snacks. An increasing number of businesses are getting into the “healthy convenience” shelf-space in grocery stores. This includes pre-packaged “fast” foods, but created with health in mind. Naked Coconuts are offering a brand-new line of paleo and vegan-friendly energy balls, with such intriguing flavours as Pistachio Cardamom, Mocha and Lemon Coconut. Vegan, non-GMO Maple Wellness Cookies are made with sprouted spelt for an extra nutritional punch and come in five different flavours, including Crunchy Ginger.

For more information on emerging wellness trends, and to come sample some of these for yourself, plan on attending The Wellness Show at the Vancouver Convention Centre West Feb. 1 and 2, 2020. The show includes 250+ exhibitors, five stages with 100+ demonstrations in fitness, celebrity chefs and more, tons of free samples, and loads of information. For tickets, and information, please visit www.thewellnessshow.com.

This story was provided by the Wellness Show for commercial purposes.

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